Tag Archives: Round the Mountain

The CROOKED NHA

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Say you’re a 501c3 non-profit group with a clever name and cute logo. Convince
a few strategic folks—a congressman, a senator, and a press that might as well be
your own PR firm—to back you up. Then take 19 counties in SWVA, and draw a
boundary line around them. Hold 12 “public information meetings”, without mentioning any of this to the 19 elected county boards. Your own board of directors has some tourism folks and planning district commission figureheads across the region—names that pop up on board after board—so you’ve got “district-wide participation”. Get their network to write some letters of support. Take ‘em to your buddies in Congress. Then get everything inside the boundary line designated a National Heritage Area, fast-tracked through those hallowed halls as easy as one-two-three, with no debate.

Then, bingo! In the immortal words of Nancy Pelosi, we’ll find out what’s in the
bill after we pass it. Congratulations! You are now the unelected “managing entity” of almost 21% of the state. As long as you do things just like the National
Park Service says, the Secretary of the Interior will turn on a pipeline of federal
grant money that will keep all your special interest groups’ special interests welllubricated. Just like that. In the name of preserving the unique cultural heritage of a huge chunk of SWVA—how did it ever survive this long without you?— you are now the man.

Really? Is that all it takes for a noble, self-governing country with a proud history to be snookered out of its representative form of government, not to mention the US and Virginia Constitutions, the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights? A 501c3 with a gleam in their eye? In this issue, we follow the money and find out.

After examining some NHAs that have been around for a while, we’ve determined that across the board, their management plans start out sounding like promoting the natural assets of the region— the art, music and food—is the answer to all of your economic prayers, we documented that a few years
down the road, the plans for the region start sounding a lot more like the UN’s
official policy on land.

“Land…cannot be treated as an ordinary asset, controlled by individuals and subject to the pressures and inefficiencies of the market. Private land ownership is also a principal instrument of accumulation and concentration of wealth and therefore contributes to social injustice; if unchecked, it may become a major obstacle in the planning and implementation of development schemes. The provision of decent dwellings and healthy conditions for the people can only be achieved if land is used in the interests of society as a whole. Public control of land use is therefore indispensable….” http://www.sovereignty.net/p/land/unproprts.htm

But since we’ve encountered a reluctance to believe such a plan could ever replace the authority of our local boards and planning commissions, we decided to document the victims.

What we found is shocking. And in case there is still denial of the connection to the global plan of action, Agenda 21—the “secret” that’s been around for 30 years— we prove that it’s no secret. UN Agenda 21 is Sustainable Development. Sustainable Development—no matter how sweet it is made to sound—is UN Agenda 21. And the management plan for The Crooked Road National Heritage Area is one and the same.